Work Policies That Should Be Done Away With

Work Policies That Should Be Done Away With

Work policies and rules should help clarify expectations and make things run smoothly. Some rules that were put into place many years ago need to be updated or removed altogether.

  1. Stop requiring a copy of a funeral notice or doctor’s note be provided to substantiate time off. You should be able to take your employees at their word when there’s been a death in the family or if they need a few days off for sick leave. If you can’t, why are they working for you in the first place?
  2. Lose the old-fashioned dress codes. Instead of giving stitch-level instructions on what to wear, simply tell employees to “Dress appropriately for a business office and err on the side of caution.” Detailing the length of hemlines or the style of jacket required is a level of micromanagement that few have time for. There will always be times when discussions over wardrobe come up, but that’s a normal part of a manager’s job.
  3. Ditch the policy that doesn’t count or value work that happens outside of your facility. Many people work numerous hours outside of the traditional 9-5pm schedule. Answering emails and working on reports from home should be valued. It’s 2017, and smart employers recognized the value of flextime and working from home a long time ago. If you trust your employees to get their work done, does it really matter where they do it?
  4. Get rid of antiquated disciplinary rules. The idea of discipline comes from the military. We would never put a plumber you’ve hired on probation or put notes of disciplinary action in his or her file, so why do it to your employees? A better way to handle things is to discuss issues as them come up and keep the lines of communication open. Demerits and write ups should be a thing of the past.
  5. Stop forbidding managers from giving letters of recommendation to former employees. Today, companies are so afraid of litigation (and violating company policy), that they will not allow managers to serve as a reference for a former employee. But when a good employee decides to move on, it’s the right thing to do to help them on their journey. Saying a few complementary words can go a long way.